Daily Archives: June 30, 2015

Africa Reign: Lisa Chiriseri

6-01

Lisa Chiriseri is the founder of FACEZ which stands for “Fund A Child’s Education Zimbabwe” and FACEZ’s vision is to build a powerful local based education fund that assists marginalized and under privileged children attain a brighter future through access education and holistic support. Lisa also founded “Street Exit Strategies”a rehabilitation organisation working with people living and working on the street. Girls and women are close to Lisa’s heart and that is why she founded “Girls Monthly Meet” a young women’personal development program with over 160 members to date.

Lisa has co-founded the African Women Awards that aim to eradicate poverty, oppression, gender inequality and promote independence by providing impact on sustaining solutions for women. The awards will provide access to education, training and mentorship to African Women.

Africa Reign sounds to me like two words that present well who we are as a people; Kings and Queens, Princesses and Princes.  Africans have always held each other in high esteem , each tribe or family known and respected for their uniqueness and strengths.

How can we as the African youth build the African Dream?

We as African youth can build the African Dream by driving a collective understanding of what the ‘dream’ truly is. Over the years Africans youth have become less and less like the generations before us in our thinking and behaviour- we are less community minded and more individualistic, less giving and more about grabbing, less patient and perseverant and ever looking for ways to get rich quick, we are less moral and more self destructive than ever and we have no idea how to get back to where we once were as a people and in some cases no DESIRE to do so. All this is due to the fact that we lack a common vision, a common understanding and common goal for where we want Africa to be and how we can be involved in helping her get there.

African youth must rise to mould  and shape the true  the African Dream-  brand it, propel it, love it and each take the personal responsibility of living  deliberately , intentionally and purposefully towards it.

Do u think the youth is motivated enough to help develop Africa?

 I think African youth are extremely driven and motivated. We just sometimes lack common direction and understanding. It is our welcomed role to drive the development of Africa we just need to have our energies honed and channeled towards collective progress and productivity.

What is women empowerment & entrepreneurship’s role in developing a better Africa?

Empowering women has been proven to be one of the most powerful micro development tools. A woman’s  success will always equate to a family’s upliftment. Empower every single women in Africa today and see this continent’s people fully taken care of without a doubt. We still however need men- their experience, their expertise their objectivity and their male instincts have driven and still support development today. Entrepreneuership will take Africa to the next level; it will allow us to begin to control, hone and maximise our wealth and resources for ourselves,  own the process and benefit to the fullest from every stage of that process. Africa must continue to produce world class entrepreneurs that will lead and sustain the rest of our societies.

 

See the African Women Awards www.africanwomenawards.com for more info and inspiration on where Africa is going and which women are taking her there…. 

And see www.facez.co.zw  for an idea of what some young people have begun to do to make sure that Africa ‘s future is protected..

Facebook Pages: FACEZ ; GMM – Girls Monthly Meet
Twitter: LisaChiriseri
Google+: Lisa Chiriseri
Instagram: LisaChiriseri

Advertisements

Africa Reign: Yemurai Nyoni

18-01

Yemurai Nyoni is a 25-year-old Zimbabwean activist, who expects to influence global governance within the next 15 years through equipping young leaders and creating and supporting spaces for youth to exercise their leadership. As a leader in his country, he helped build and eventually led a national network of over 1200 young leaders working on sexual and reproductive health in Zimbabwe. His experience as an activist has seen him serve in a number of leadership positions nationally, regionally and globally. He also provides constant mentorship support and voluntary consultancy for young leaders in the African region who lead organizations in their countries.

Yemurai cares about women and girls because they’re largely at the receiving end of bad social policy, the repercussions of war, and the impact of drought and disease. According to the World Bank, women account for 61 percent of those living with HIV and young women are three times more likely to be HIV positive than young men. Girls continue to be married off in their adolescence, which puts them at grave risk of experiencing violence from their significantly older counterparts as well as adverse complications of pregnancy and childbirth.

In my view, according to the statistics we see everyday, being a young African woman is perhaps the most perilous form of identity in the world today. African women and girls face heightened life risks from the complications of pregnancy and child birth, are subjected different kinds of violence and t disenfranchised by our patriarchal society. I believe this isn’t right, and that we must turn the world on its head to right this injustice.

Yemurai also believes that the current investment case for women and girls should not focus on the burden of disease or the development challenges they face. He believes that we should focus instead on the strength and immense potential that women present as the ‘better-half’ of humanity. We must not invest in women because of their perceived weakness but because of their definite strength. Women are the driving force behind agriculture in the continent, they actively build the capacity of their children, are innovators in business and politics and have great resilience in the face of adversities like war, famine and disease. This is what fuels his passion for women and girls and he has determined that if he can play the smallest part in ensuring gender equality then he must play it well.

What does Africa Reign mean to you?

I value the concept of building a generation of African youth with the power to redefine their identity, shake of historical inferiority and claim their God-given influence. Africa Reign to me represents a movement with these values; a reflection of the strength of the youth of our continent and a chance to reconstruct the perception of what it means to be African.

What steps should we as African youngster take in order to move Africa Forward?

The first is to stop thinking small. To do this we must become more inquisitive, we must seek to find out why things are the way they are, to analyse the things we consume and find out how we can create them ourselves. We must change our mindsets from being perennial consumers of foreign culture, technology and education, to being producers of authentic African products. Who says British citizens shouldn’t learn Swahili or that the African drum shouldn’t become a core feature in international orchestras. So I challenge every young African to learn something new every year, to buy a notebook and think of new inventions. Create your own vacuum of innovation and force yourself to produce solutions to our continent’s challenges. Refuse to accept the existing order.

Check out Yemurai on his social media platforms

Skype: yemurai.nyoni
Twitter: @YNyoni
Blog: www.conversations4change.wordpress.com
Facebook: Yemurai Nyoni

 

 

Africa Reign: Ruramai Musekiwa

5-01

Ruramai  Musekiwa is  a creative activist who’s passionate about art life and effecting positive social change through creative mediums and campaigns. She is a graphic designer by trade, writer, visual artist and aspirant muso. “Rudo” as she is affectionately known strives to find the balance between an extremely philanthropic business model and a focused profitable value proposition. “Sibahle”which means we are beautiful: is a campaign that was started by Rudo that is aimed at celebrating Africanism through the use of creative mediums and activations, an electric lifestyle brand with the African woman at the helm of its vision. 

African Reign to me is us owing our space and purpose individually and collectively and building on a foundation of passion and awareness of our beauty as a people.

According to Rudo building the “African Dream” starts with recognizing our power, potential and beauty. Once we have a new frame of reference, one that speaks to power and positivity, that energy will flow into progressive endeavors. through the Sibahle initiative, book clubs have been started in major cities like Johannesburg, Cape Town and even spiraling into London. Rudo is doing  a remarkable job by getting more African youth involved and showcasing their work on Sibahle Magazine. For us as the youth to help develop Africa, there should be campaigns that encourage active citizenry. Ruramai believes that there is hope for the youth and there is a generation of youth that are running with innovative concepts.

I think the media needs to stop perpetuating negative stereotypes and start highlighting the positive things that are happening on out continent. The subliminal impact of seeing negativity frequently is crippling.

Check out more on Sibahle and Ruramai’s work on www.sibahle.com

10623346_391480297724448_225190769462282763_o 10672038_390185737853904_9176743739692797397_n 10847564_367871500085328_22271484944078655_o 11031986_404486173090527_5479958001780811591_o 11042676_378321695706975_9116955582264035047_n (1)  11118142_396787537193724_3674589745096582177_n 11130498_398352733703871_2462962963039927033_o 11148553_395988107273667_6105591857928674569_n 11154687_400635213475623_4785392056098026439_o  11329970_403614189844392_2736036471981952254_n 11392853_403585983180546_4332779000685615866_n